The Strategically Small Church – Brandon J. O’Brien

From the Back Cover

Our culture’s infatuation with bigness–bigger cars, bigger houses, bigger businesses–has infiltrated the church. But smaller doesn’t equal second-rate, and bigger isn’t better.

Leadership Journal editor and former pastor Brandon O’Brien in Stategically Small Churches shows how small churches are uniquely equipped for success in today’s culture. O’Brien celebrates churches that are taking full advantage of their small size and analyzes how other churches can learn from their strategies.

For example, strategically small churches: facilitate a higher level of commitment from laypeople focus attention on fewer programs, increasing effectiveness nurture close relationships across age and life-experience barriers But perhaps most important, O’Brien asks churches to rethink what it means to be successful. Sometimes small is just right.

My Review
Having grown up as a Christian in a small church I was excited to read this book.  Initially I was concerned that the author was going to tell me how big churches pretend to be small, but yet have all the resources of a big church. I was grateful that the author was merely showing that many mega-churches are recognizing the benefits of community and a need to have “smallness.”
Mr. O’Brien did a good job of identifying the benefits of a small church. This book reminds pastors and lay leaders as well, that viewing success by the number of people in your church isn’t Biblical. He gives us a much better and realistic way to look at our churches. Bigger is not necessarily better.
The author deals with four key points for the strategically small church:  intimacy, being nimble, authenticity, and effectiveness. He draws out each of these topics with practical information and examples of ways a churches have done this. He also gives some warnings of what not to do.  The effectiveness chapter is probably the most critical for the small church. Here the author gives some excellent examples of how small churches around the country have made an impact in their community.
This is a great book for pastors of small churches who may struggle with the definition of success. It can be a source of encouragement as well as ideas to help them lead their churches.

Learn more about the author at his website: http://brandonjobrien.com/

To buy your own copy:

207839: The Strategically Small Church: Intimate, Nimble, Authentic, and Effective The Strategically Small Church: Intimate, Nimble, Authentic, and Effective

By Brandon J. O’Brien / Bethany House

Our culture’s infatuation with bigness–bigger cars, bigger houses, bigger businesses–has infiltrated the church. But smaller doesn’t equal second-rate, and bigger isn’t better.

Leadership Journal editor and former pastor Brandon O’Brien in Stategically Small Churches shows how small churches are uniquely equipped for success in today’s culture. O’Brien celebrates churches that are taking full advantage of their small size and analyzes how other churches can learn from their strategies.

For example, strategically small churches: facilitate a higher level of commitment from laypeople focus attention on fewer programs, increasing effectiveness nurture close relationships across age and life-experience barriers But perhaps most important, O’Brien asks churches to rethink what it means to be successful. Sometimes small is just right.

I would like to thank Bethany House Publishing company for providing this book for my review.

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HollyMag321

I love to read, especially mystery books. Though in the past couple of years I've been a part of the ACFW Book Club and have found some wonderful writers. It's been fun to interact with authors.

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